use volatile pointers for intentional-crash code.
authorRich Felker <dalias@aerifal.cx>
Mon, 6 Jun 2011 22:10:43 +0000 (18:10 -0400)
committerRich Felker <dalias@aerifal.cx>
Mon, 6 Jun 2011 22:10:43 +0000 (18:10 -0400)
src/malloc/malloc.c
src/time/__asctime.c

index bc8382e..1a1a51f 100644 (file)
@@ -395,7 +395,7 @@ void *realloc(void *p, size_t n)
                size_t oldlen = n0 + extra;
                size_t newlen = n + extra;
                /* Crash on realloc of freed chunk */
-               if ((uintptr_t)base < mal.brk) *(char *)0=0;
+               if ((uintptr_t)base < mal.brk) *(volatile char *)0=0;
                if (newlen < PAGE_SIZE && (new = malloc(n))) {
                        memcpy(new, p, n-OVERHEAD);
                        free(p);
@@ -458,7 +458,7 @@ void free(void *p)
                char *base = (char *)self - extra;
                size_t len = CHUNK_SIZE(self) + extra;
                /* Crash on double free */
-               if ((uintptr_t)base < mal.brk) *(char *)0=0;
+               if ((uintptr_t)base < mal.brk) *(volatile char *)0=0;
                __munmap(base, len);
                return;
        }
index 1853580..d31f634 100644 (file)
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ char *__asctime(const struct tm *tm, char *buf)
                 * application developers that they may not be so lucky
                 * on other implementations (e.g. stack smashing..).
                 */
-               *(int*)0 = 0;
+               *(volatile int*)0 = 0;
        }
        return buf;
 }